This story is a trick-or-treat article that should have been posted a week ago, but you will probably still enjoy it. (Anything about kids or animals is a good story). This article is from Nov. 2, 1978, Windham Journal (43 years ago). At the end of the story is a brief description of how the candy-filled day began.

“Sunday afternoon seemed like a good time to have a Halloween party for the tots of Haines Falls, and so the Haines Falls Community Hall, above the library rooms, was buzzing with laughter and excitement as the annual goblins party got underway. The sponsors were again, as in previous years, the People of Haines Falls. They arranged for the party, provided the refreshments, and later showed the kids a movie. The refreshments were a donation of Twilight Groceries.

Prizes were given to the three selected winners: In the six and younger category, Gary Siatkowski, made up as a hemlock tree, was judged the most original costume wearer, Jamie Lynn Terns as a little angel was the prettiest, and Salvatore Michaud as banker wore the funniest costume.”

The judges were: Nancy Cusick, Renata Carucci, Father Francis Dunbar, William Bennett, and Earl Schoonmaker.

The children played games, and after all the goodies were eaten, they watched a movie. Tidbit: It sounds like a fun party for the kids, sponsored by the People of Haines Falls, with Hillard Hommel as President.

Tidbits: Bits of history taken from an October 27, 2021, article, “What’s the Real History of Halloween – and Why Do WE Celebrate It on October 31,” by Blair Donovan (staff writer for CountryLiving.com).

“The history of Halloween goes back to a pagan festival called Samhain.” (Samhain, a Gaelic word [Sah-win] was usually celebrated from October 31 to November 1.” It was the time to welcome in the harvest and usher in “the dark half of the year”).

The mystical rituals of earlier times evolved into more lighthearted fun and games. The candy-grabbing concept became mainstream in the United States in the early to mid-1900s. It’s estimated that by early in the 20th century, Halloween was celebrated across North America by the majority of candy-loving, costume-wearing people.

I hope it was a good, fun day.

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Johnson Newspapers 7.1

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