HUDSON — Nearly 300 survey respondents identified three preferred alternate routes with price tags ranging from $1.4 million to $25.8 million as the city’s truck traffic study continues.

The purpose of the survey was to solicit public opinion on alternate truck route options considered to redirect truck traffic that does not have a destination within the city.

The city hired MJ Engineering and Land Surveying, P.C., of Clifton Park, last fall to conduct a study to find an alternate truck route using a $100,000 budget line secured by Assemblywoman Didi Barrett, D-106, through the state Department of Transportation.

An origins-and-destination study as part of the project determined 47% of the trucks that go through Hudson do not have a destination in the city.

Of 276 responses to a survey of five proposed alternate routes, three were favored: Option 12, Option 3 and Option 1B.

More than half the respondents, or 56%, said they are Hudson city residents, but 43% of the respondents said they live within city limits and 57% said they do not. Twelve percent of respondents said they are commuters, 12% said they are business owners or store managers and 51% identified themselves as “other.”

The majority of respondents, or 84%, said truck traffic within city limits is an issue and an alternate route should be designated.

The respondents’ first choice was Option 12, which would go from Route 9 to Healy Boulevard to Route 66 to Fish and Game Road to Route 9H to Route 23B to Route 23. Fish and Game Road would need road improvements costing an anticipated $1.4 million, according to MJ Engineering.

The second most popular was Option 3, which goes from Route 9 to a new road to Route 9H to Route 23B to Route 23. The new road would have to be constructed to link Route 9 and Route 9H, costing an anticipated $25.8 million, according to MJ.

Option 1B was the third favorite among respondents. The route, which goes from Route 9 to Healy Boulevard to Route 66 to Mearle Avenue to Lone Star Road to Route 23B to Spook Rock Road to Route 9H to Route 23, would require road improvements to Mearle Avenue, Lone Star Road and Spook Rock Road. It would likely cost $7.9 million, according to MJ.

Common suggestions among respondents were to maximize using state routes and avoid residential areas, particularly Route 23B through Claverack.

The other two options, 1A and 6, would cost $7 million and $3.1 million, respectively. Option 1A would go from Route 9 to Healy Boulevard to Route 66 to Mearle Avenue to Lone Star Road to Route 23B to Spook Rock Road to Hiscox Road to Fingar Road to Route 23. Option 6 would go from Route 9 to Healy Boulevard to Route 66 to Route 23B to Newman Road to Route 9 to Route 23.

The way cost influenced respondents’ answers varied.

Less than a quarter, or 18%, said cost was a very important factor while considering their favorite route; 21% said it was not important and 40% said it was somewhat important. Twenty-one percent of respondents said they need more information.

Harms and risks of trucks in Hudson, based on its dense population, are symptoms from inhalation of diesel exhaust, trucks turning on narrow streets impacting pedestrian infrastructure, various degradation in the community potentially prohibiting tourism, vibration from heavy vehicles potentially damaging subterranean infrastructure and future repairs to road, sidewalk and property infrastructure being costly, according to MJ. Confined roads and intersections within the city make travel difficult for trucks.

Over the most recent five-year period, the highest number of crash incidents within city limits involving trucks included 68 on Green Street, 50 on Columbia Street and 46 on 3rd Street, according to MJ.

As for crash incidents involving trucks outside the city limits, 12 were on Route 23B and Route 9G/Route 23; 35 were on Route 23/Route 9; one was on Route 23/Fingar Road; 35 were on Route 23/Route 9H; 31 were on Route 23B/Route 9H; 14 were on Fish and Game Road/Route 9H; and 33 were on Route 66/Route 9H.

The crash data is from the state Department of Transportation.

The next steps for MJ are to review public input, recommend a feasible truck alternative route and prepare the final truck study report. A draft of the report can be viewed on the city website. Comments can be submitted to HudsonTruckStudy@gmail.com.

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