Skip to main content

Kids, community called to help in community design

  • Residents participate in Raising Places, a project funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a partnership with the Greater-Good Studio in Chicago, to help make Hudson an inviting place for children and families. 

  • Hudson residents gather to discuss how to make the community better for families and children. 

February 2, 2018 10:25 pm Updated: February 2, 2018 10:28 pm

HUDSON — Kite’s Nest and Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood are hosting a workshop Sunday to share ideas for improving the community to make Hudson a more kid- and-family-friendly environment. 


The workshop is part of a community design process called Raising Places — a project funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which is a partnership with the Greater-Good Studio in Chicago. 
The project is focusing on the biggest issues facing family and children in Hudson, said Sara Kendall of Kite’s Nest, who is one of the community members working on the project. 


“The biggest issues facing family and children in Hudson are, not surprisingly, housing and affordability and a lack of accessible spaces for youth and families,” Kendall said. “Another was looking pathways for employment for young people growing up here and that being a barrier for children. The other is relationship between police and youth.”


Sunday’s Action Lab is a community workshop to share feedback on ideas for improving our city and plan for the future. The group plans to share ideas the team has been working on and engaging our communities for continued feedback and participation. 


As part of the project, dozens of community members have been interviewed, from teenagers, parents, members of social service organizations and law enforcement. 


Kite’s Nest and Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood were selected as one of six community representatives around the country to participate in the program. 


What makes the program unique, is that children and teens are invited to be part of the process, Kendall said. 


“What feels really unique is that we are really looking at things through lens of youth and family — it’s a multigenerational lens — to figure out what makes this city healthy,” Kendall said. 


A presentation will be held from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. An open house will be held from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the Hudson Area Library at 51 N. Fifth St. Everyone, including kids and families, is welcome.


“Throughout the spring, we will be learning from the feedback on Sunday and deciding which ideas to really move forward with this require funding or more partners,” Kendall said.


To reach reporter Amanda Purcell, call 518-828-1616 ext. 2500, or send an email to apurcell@thedailymail.net, or tweet to @amandajpurcell.