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BRIDGE TO BEETHOVEN

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July 31, 2019 12:42 pm

HUNTER — BRIDGE TO BEETHOVEN featuring Shai Wosner, Piano, Jennifer Koh, Violin

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 8 p.m., Doctorow Center for the Arts, 7971 Main Street • Hunter

Tickets Purchased Ahead: $25; $20 seniors; $7 students

At the Door: $30; $25 seniors; $7 students

For tickets call 518 263 2063

Pianist Shai Wosner has attracted international recognition for his exceptional artistry, musical integrity, and creative insight. His performances of a broad range of repertoire—from Beethoven and Schubert to Legetti and the music of today—reflect a degree of virtuosity and intellectual curiosity that has made him a favorite among audiences and critics.

Jennifer Koh is a violinist known for intense, commanding performances, delivered with dazzling virtuosity and technical assurance. She’s a forward-thinking artist dedicated to exploring a broad and eclectic repertoire, while promoting diversity and inclusivity in classical music. She has expanded the contemporary violin repertoire through a wide range of commissioning projects, and has premiered more than 70 works written especially for her. Her quest for the new and unusual, sense of endless curiosity and ability to lead and inspire a host of multidisciplinary collaborators truly set her apart.

ABOUT BRIDGE TO BEETHOVEN

“The reason sonatas are so important for music is because they are the vehicle for composers to actually develop material, to actually have themes or tunes become something else in front of our ears.”

–Shai Wosner

“Bridge to Beethoven really explores this idea of how people from totally different backgrounds and totally different races and totally different places and totally different families, and different countries: how is it that we unite, in essentially this musical language? Bridge to Beethoven is really about creating bridges to one’s own personal understanding of Beethoven….”

–Jennifer Koh

“Bridge to Beethoven, for me, is really the connection between Beethoven’s spirit of revolution and development, and the work of young contemporary composers. This breaking of boundaries is very much a part of what Beethoven was about, and so the idea of breaking down barriers between different kinds of music, between jazz, between avant-garde, and between this great tradition of classical music, is really the heart of this project.”

–Shai Wosner